Stem Cell Therapy: Passing Fad or The Answer To A Long and Healthy Life?

is stem cell therapy worth the wait?

Raising a healthy child can at times seem mission impossible.

Pollution, processed foods, trans-fats, plastics, sodium, organics, gluten, grains, clean eating; every day there’s a new health trend circulating the web, telling us what we need less or more of in our children’s lives.

“Ok, so we’ve got rid of everything processed and high in salt, sugar, and fat, but what about wheat? And should they be drinking cow’s milk? I hear it’s more suited for calves. Oh, and we need to stay away from all plastic whatsoever — you wouldn’t believe…”

I am sure all the warnings and health concerns can quickly become overwhelming.

“And now what’s this — stem cell therapy? I already have enough to worry about, why do I need this?”

Health is certainly not something you want to stress over, but a little bit of knowledge can be a powerful thing. And far from being just another worry to add to the list, stem cell therapy may be the most important health-related breakthrough you read about for decades.

Another fad or a revolution in health care?

I recently saw a story in the news about a 102-year-old lady who credits a pint of beer a day as the secret to living a long life. At over a century old, the delightful Ms Bowers isn’t kidding herself. She knows it’s likely not the beer that’s keeping her young, but rather a good set of genes.

Throughout your life, stem cells differentiate and replenish all the cells of the body, from blood and bone to muscle and brain cells. During this process, certain genes are either activated or inactivated essentially turned on or off. Which genes are turned on or off (gene expression) is dependent on external factors such as your diet and environment, as well as internal factors, namely your stem cells.

Unfortunately, as we age, our stem cells become less able to multiply and replenish tissues with cells that are functional and error free. This can cause genetic disease to come to the fore and also reduce our ability to repair muscle damage, fight off infection, and recover from illness.

Today, science is proving we can help manage gene expression and keep our stem cells healthy by having a nutrient-rich diet and doing frequent exercise. But as our stem cells inevitably grow older and become weaker, how do we safeguard ourselves against injury and disease? Well, we know our stem cells are never healthier than when we are young, and thanks to the discovery of stem cells in our baby teeth over a decade ago, we’re now able to harness their incredible powers for many more years to come.

We’ll always hear new tips and recommendations for living a healthier life, but it’s not every day we come to understand the fundamental mechanisms behind how the body stays young, healthy, and disease free.

You can act today to look after your child’s stem cells, not just by watching what they eat and making them exercise more, but by banking their stem cells for future use.

Regulated stem cell treatments in hospitals and clinics may not be quite there yet, but the science certainly is. And with everyone from Obama, the NHS, David Cameron, and leading research organisations such as Stanford all backing stem cell therapy, it’s only a matter of time before we have full access to our body’s natural repair system. Make sure you’re children will be ready to fully benefit from it and bank their stem cells today. 

Are you prepared for a future of personalised stem cell therapies? Contact us today to find out how we can help safeguard the health of your children by storing stem cells from milk teeth.

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About the author: Joseph Pennington
Joseph is a resident medical writer for BioEden and a passionate advocate of personalised and regenerative medicine — particularly tooth stem cell banking. He believes stem cell therapy to be the biggest breakthrough in health care since the discovery of Penicillin.